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Jane Francis

I include painting, drawing, photography, artist's books, small scale sculpture and writing in my practice. My method of painting involves exploring the mobility of the painted surface, playing with tensions and relationships between freedom and control. I begin from references to geographical patterns, natural and human forms, or simply emotional states or responses to the movements of the body. I often integrate materials such as wool, found objects and collage. I have also been branching out into making sculptural forms, exploring states of fragility and strength. I often photograph my three dimensional objects’, enjoying the images they make, and re-integrating them into further two dimensional work..

I have designed and implemented several socially engaged art projects, all of which have facilitated a wide range of people of all ages to reflect on, respond to, and make art about their environment and sense of place, familiarity/strangeness, and belonging. These are subjects which fascinate me, and I find people, and especially children, respond to with great enthusiasm and depth, and with nuanced outcomes. I find it incredibly satisfying to work with people and facilitate their own discoveries in making art. I am one of the founders and original directors of Inverkeithing Arts Initiative, a not-for-profit arts organisations in South West Fife. Our exhibition space, workshop area and gallery can be found at Maker in Inverkeithing, number 2a High Street. Have a look on our website www.inverkeithingarts.org for current exhibitions and workshops.

Liminal States

In the last two years I have been developing work which explores the phenomenology of trauma. I have been exploring ways of expressing mind/body dissociation, rhythm and disruption, loss and bliss, and rupture and rapture, as well as self portraiture which etches on the surface of the face the experiences of fear and liminality, the uncanny and the unsettling. This work has been deeply personal, and yet has led me out of the maze in which trauma leads, into an urgent sense of immanent ‘being alive-ness’.